Posts Tagged ‘family’

Only Yesterdays

Oh the times we could have had

I’ve lived them all

Mostly by myself.

Sometimes a little too often

Or so I’ve been told.

Yet, they give me comfort.

Simply moving on is never an option

At least for a mother

And more so in times, a father too.

Most times

In my imaginings

You are grown

And it is Christmas time

Our favorite time of year

And the fire is blazing

The tea is poured

Our Christmas tree is lit

And warming our hands by the hearth

We sit in silence

Smiling

Remembering all the days that came before.

Sometimes a chuckle breaks the silence,

“Remember when …”

And a story begins

No doubt, events embellished by the years,

All the while sipping our tea.

Eating our biscuits.

Warming our hands.

And living in moments,

Never lived.

© 2010, Tim (P) Prendeville

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Christmas with Gene Autry and years gone by

Christmas is my favorite time of year … always has been.  When I was a kid, putting up the decorations in our home was my favorite time of year; and every year Gene Autry was on the record player … morning, noon, and night.  There came a time when I moved on from all those things, and didn’t listen to Gene Autry, didn’t decorate trees, and let Christmas come and go in stride.  I hoped the few times back home, over the years, that I could recapture some of the Christmas spirit that was there in my youth, but … it, and everyone, just like me, had moved on.  Not to say that those trips weren’t enjoyable; just not ideal.  There was still the little pin holes in the ceilings from years of hanging streamers, and looking at those always gave me a smile.  It wasn’t until Tara was born in 2002 that Gene Autry made a come back, and when Alyssa arrived in 2004, he was still going strong … indeed, he still is today … I’m on the return leg of my trip through life now, the nostalgia portion … what was in, that went out, is back in again … and long may it live … “Merry Christmas folks … where ever you may be” …

Worth a Christmas Spin …

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=1D9CBDBEC0D5F983

 

Irishocity

www.irishocity.wordpress.com

www.youtube.com/user/irishocity

www.irishocity.com

www.facebook.com/timprendeville

www.timprendeville.com

© 2010, Tim (P) Prendeville

Hindsights and Perceptions

Rain.
Days and days of rain.
Was it ever any other way?
All of those days,
Perpetual darkness and gloom.
Did the sun not ever shine?
It must have.
It must have.
Didn’t it?
I just don’t remember.
I just don’t.
Why is that I wonder?
All those years.
Even when I look back now,
It’s rain I remember
And nothing much else.
But I’m sure there must have been more.
Wasn’t there?

© 2010, Tim (P) Prendeville

My Wife’s Family

A piece I wrote a year or so ago and was reminded of over the Christmas break, after a get together with my wife’s in-laws … it really should be taken with the proverbial grain of salt … for the most part they’re a good bunch of people and a lot of fun to be around … but as with all families, there are always times where harmony is hard to find …

Well I just got back from a trip down south
Where I met with some in-laws I can never figure out
Some of them are fine and some of them are not
And the rest are fine with alcohol
And lots and lots of pot

(chorus)
Family
My wife’s family
My wife’s family
My wife’s crazy family

After 6 hours in a car driving though Los Angeles
Where the traffic can be murder and the smog a yellow haze
The kids all in the back crying “are we nearly there”
And the wife wrapped up in god knows what
Life is so unfair

(chorus)
Family
My wife’s family
My wife’s family
My wife’s crazy family

Well I know I signed up for the long term marriage with my wife
And I know the preacher warned me that sometimes there would be strife
But If I knew back then the grief I’d have to put up with today
I’d run a thousand miles from here
Far far away

(chorus)
From family
Her crazy family
My wife’s family
Her crazy family

There’s an aunt that vacations there and she scares me so
My wife tries to tell me that she’s all a show
But I’ve seen her throw a look my way every now and then
That tells me that she hates me and I’m going straight to hell

(chorus)
Family
My wife’s family
My wife’s family
My wife’s crazy family

There’s a cupboard in the kitchen that I run to now and then
It’s stacked and packed with alcohol which makes the trip real swell
I’m not alone at night time when the shots are flowing fast
I guess I’m not only in-law needing booze to outlast

(chorus)
Family
My wife’s family
My wife’s family
My wife’s crazy family

Well I know I signed up for the long term marriage with my wife
And I know the preacher warned me that sometimes there would be strife
But If I knew back then the grief I’d have to put up with today
I’d run a thousand miles from here
Far far away

(chorus)
From family
My wife’s family
My wife’s family
My wife’s crazy family

I guess I’m stuck with all the in-laws that intrude from time to time
It’s no wonder that I drink and smoke and bitch and moan and whine
But from what I see and hear from all the other people that I know
It seems that in-laws are the same no matter where you go

(chorus)
Family
My wife’s crazy family
My wife’s family
My wife’s crazy family

Well I know I signed up for the long term marriage with my wife
And I know the preacher warned me that sometimes there would be strife
But If I knew back then the grief I’d have to put up with today
I’d run a thousand miles from here
Far far away

(chorus)
From family
My wife’s crazy family
My wife’s family
My wife’s crazy family

© 2010, Tim (P) Prendeville

A Hand To Hold

A short time ago my six-year-old daughter’s teacher told her that she’d soon be old enough to walk to class by herself, and not “drag” her poor dad along all the way from the car. I was within earshot of this at the time and casually smiled it off as a nonoccurrence.  But for some reason this morning it came back to me, and the profoundness and fragility of such an utterance hit me hard.  It occurred to me that I never want my daughter to feel so grown up that she wouldn’t want me to walk somewhere with her.  I never want her to be so grown up that she doesn’t want to hold my hand in front of her friends, or give me a kiss and a hug goodbye in the morning, or be embarrassed by me when I goof around with her in public.  I want to be with her until I take that last walk with her down the aisle, and hand her off to whomever she chooses to be her life partner … and even then, I’ll have problems letting go.

I remember the first morning I saw you
Taking your first peek at the world
And the look of confusion
And a face full of questions
But no fear.

I remember it was raining
A typical Irish day
Though it was June
And in my heart, I knew
That my life was now not my own.

I remember phone calls made and one line texts
Telling those who cared that all was well
Five fingers five toes and eyes that were mine
And making plans to wet the baby’s head
Old Irish traditions live long

I remember Granny
And the first time she held you
In the sun lounge where the sun seldom shines
And her smile speaking volumes
The way only a granny’s smile can

I remember your first day in school
And tears that were shed
And wondering where the years had gone
And why so fast
And becoming fearful of a future without you

I remember all of your days
Your first steps
Your first fall
Your first words
Your first smile
Your first pain
Your first ice cream
Your first everything

When you have grown
And put away those little girl ways
And live in a world of your own making
And no longer need my hand to hold
I hope it is because
I have taught you well.

© 2009, Tim (P) Prendeville

Pancake Tuesday … Irish Style

There’s one day in the year when my two daughters are allowed to let loose on the candy and ensuing sugar rush (although apparently it’s not the sugar that causes the rush) … Super bowl Sunday! … we plan it for weeks, purchasing a variety of candy, chips, soda, and for me, a boat load of chicken wings.  However, this morning, my sister Barbara, now living in Sydney, sent me an email asking if we had had our pancakes today, today being Pancake Tuesday or “Shrove” Tuesday as it is known outside of Ireland.  I had completely forgotten about it.  Fortunately for me though, my Tuesday was only beginning here in California; Sydney, 17 hours ahead of me, had already celebrated the day, and was tucking itself into bed.  Like Scrooge waking on Christmas morning, rejuvenated by fear of futures thwarted, I immediately smiled, thinking about all those Pancake Tuesdays I enjoyed so much growing up in Ireland … and how my mom would stand for hour on end over her little frying pan and make pancake after pancake for us all … and drown it in sugar and lemon juice … I miss those days.
So, why should the Super Bowl be the only non traditional American holiday we celebrate in the California Prendeville Clan?  No reason at all … That being said, I told the girls, still eating breakfast, that dinner today would be Irish pancakes … they couldn’t believe it and immediately began talking excitedly about such an odd occurrence and treat … Pancakes for them are usually a Sunday morning event, something they never seem to tire of … although those pancakes are the kind that come out of a box … Not tonight though … tonight I’ll make them the way my mom used to, all those years ago in our little kitchen on Woodvale Road … our little borough on the outskirts of Cork … Happy Pancake day people!

© 2009, Tim (P) Prendeville

IRISH PANCAKES

Ingredients
2 cups flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 1/2 cups whole milk
2 eggs
1 oz unsalted butter
Additional butter for frying
granulated sugar
lemon juice

Method
1. Beat the milk and eggs together in a bowl. In another bowl, sift the flour and salt together; add half the milk and egg mixture, stirring constantly.
2. Melt the butter and whisk it in. Whisk in the rest of the remaining milk and egg mixture.
3. Allow the batter to stand at least two hours.
4. Melt 1 tbs butter in frying pan, add 1/4 cup batter and tip until the pan is evenly coated. Keep the pan moving as you cook to prevent sticking. When the underside is golden brown, flip the pancake and cook the other side.
Slide onto an oven proof platter; sprinkle with sugar and lemon juice and then, roll up.
Keep warm in a 300 degree oven until ready to serve.

http://www.irishcultureandcustoms.com/ACalend/ShroveTues.html

A Life Unlived

Oh the times we could have had
They seem so real to me
So clear in my mind
As if already lived.
All the laughs we shared,
And tears too
Memories now lost and unlived,
But clear to me that
Some day
They would have defined my life.

© 2009, Tim (P) Prendeville